Main Suite (KET, PET, FCE)

cambridge_english

KET

Cambridge English: Key, also known as Key English Test (KET), is a basic level qualification that shows you can use English to communicate in simple situations. It shows you have made a good start in learning English.

What will KET do for you?

  • KET is recognized by administrative, industrial and service-based employers around the world as a qualification in basic English
  • It is also accepted by many educational institutions for study purposes.
  • KET focuses on all four skills – reading, writing, listening and speaking. You can find out your strengths and weaknesses in using English.
  • Passing KET gives you the confidence to move to higher qualifications such as Preliminary English Test (PET) and First Certificate in English (FCE)
  • KET is designed to help you communicate more effectively in real-life situations

PET

Passing PET shows you can use everyday written and spoken English at an intermediate level.

What will PET do for you?

  • PET is accepted by many employers as proof of ability to use English for administrative and secretarial jobs. It is also widely accepted for use for work where spoken English is necessary, such as tourism, retail, construction, manufacturing and engineering.
  • Many universities and government departments officially recognize PET as an immediate qualification in English.
  • PET uses real-life situations and is designed to help you communicate more effectively.
    • PET focuses on all four skills – reading, writing, listening and speaking. You can find out your strengths and weaknesses in using English.
    • Passing PET gives you the confidence to move to higher qualifications such as First Certificate in English (FCE)

FCE

Cambridge English: First, also known as First Certificate in English (FCE), is an upper-intermediate level qualification. It proves you can use everyday written and spoken English for work or study purposes. It covers use of English in real-life situations and study environments. Learners are expected to understand the main ideas of complex texts taken from a range of sources (such as magazines, news articles and fiction), demonstrate different writing styles (such as emails, essays, letters or short stories), follow a range of spoken materials (such as news programmes and public announcements), and keep up in conversations on a wide range of topics, expressing opinions, presenting arguments and producing spontaneous spoken language.